Donna Karan Jacket – Vogue 1263 – Part 3

The fabric is very soft and a little limp – the reason for the addition of the sew-in interfacing.

Collar before pad stitchiing - very floppy with no defined shape.

Collar before pad stitchiing – very floppy with no defined shape.

When using a sew-in interfacing, especially hair canvas, it is important not to add too much thickness when joining the outer seams.  To avoid doing this, I cut a frame from the outer edges of the facing piece from black cotton muslin. The same grain line has been used and the frame trimmed to 1 ½” / 3cm wide.

Muslin frame has been cut from the outer edges of the facing pattern piece.

Muslin frame has been cut from the outer edges of the facing pattern piece.

The hair canvas was tacked and then stitched in place at the inside edge of the frame and machine stitched in place.  Excess hair canvas has been trimmed back so that when the facing is applied to the garment, only the muslin will be included in the seam allowances.

Frame tacked in place along the line marked at 3cm/ 1 1/2

Frame tacked in place along the line marked at 3cm/ 1 1/2″ from the edge of the hair canvas.

Frame stitched in place and excess hair canvas trimmed away so it will not extend into the sewn seam.

Frame stitched in place and excess hair canvas trimmed away so it will not extend into the sewn seam.

The dart take up has been trimmed away from the four neckline darts and the hair canvass has been butted together over the open darts and stitched in place using catch-stitching.

Dart take up fabric removed; hair canvass and fabric edges butted together and catch-stitched in place  over opened fabric dart.

Dart take up fabric removed; hair canvass and fabric edges butted together and catch-stitched in place over opened fabric dart.

To support the back neckline area of the collar, I have included an overlay of hair canvass along the roll line.  Dense pad-stitching has been applied within the collar stand area which will support the weight of the collar.

I created a pattern piece for the back neckline   Dart take up sections will be removed when canvass has been cut.  Once this is closely pad-stitched, it will provide support for the back upper collar.

I created a pattern piece for the back neckline Dart take up sections will be removed when canvass has been cut. Once this is closely pad-stitched, it will provide support for the back upper collar.

Back neckline support piece held over my hand to build in curved shape with small pad-stitches.

Back neckline support piece held over my hand to build in curved shape with small pad-stitches.

Finished neckline support.

Finished neckline support.

I have also taped the roll line with cotton tape (fell stitched in place on either side on the lapel side of the roll line).

Taped roll line will keep lapels in place.

Taped roll line will keep lapels in place.

The remaining collar section of the interfacing has been lightly pad-stitched.

Remaining collar section has been loosely pad-stitched.

Remaining collar section has been loosely pad-stitched.

Upper collar placed over the pad-stitched under collar.  It now has good structure and appears much more like the photo of the original design.

Upper collar placed over the pad-stitched under collar. It now has good structure and appears much more like the photo of the original design.

Strips of hair canvas have also been catch-stitched over the hem line on the garment and sleeve hems.  This will keep the hem edges in shape during the life of the garment.

Hair canvass catch-stitched in the hem area of the jacket and sleeves.

Hair canvass catch-stitched in the hem area of the jacket and sleeves.

During the next week I will be setting the sleeves, stitching the hems and applying the facing and lining.

Till next week.

Advertisements

Donna Karan Jacket – Vogue 1263 – Part 2

My usual way of working through a project is to construct all of the individual parts and then assemble the garment.

This design has one very large piece which flows from the centre front, including the shawl collar, on through the skirt section right across to the centre back with no side seams.

Pattern piece covering collar, front and skirt section to CB

Pattern piece covering collar, front and skirt section to CB

Details on this large piece include six hemline darts, two double ended “waist” darts and an interesting pouch pocket.

I have sewn and slashed the darts.  They have also been pressed them open which reduces the bulk, particularly at the hemline.  Before the hem is completed they will be topstitched in place.

Hem line darts slashed open and pressed.  To be trimmed and topstitched.

Hem line darts slashed open and pressed. To be trimmed and topstitched.

The markings for the pouch pocket were traced on to the wrong side using dressmaker’s carbon. They were then thread traced by hand. Because of the textured surface and the need accurate and clear markings, I decided to machine baste the markings as well (used a stitch length of 6.0 which was easy to remove).

Darts were thread traced from wrong side and machine traced (SL 6.0) so the pocket markings were extra clear on the right side.

Darts were thread traced from wrong side and machine traced (SL 6.0) so the pocket markings were extra clear on the right side.

Bottom of pocket markings on right side of fabric

Bottom of pocket markings on right side of fabric

Nice deep pouch pocket will be good to keep hands warm.

Nice deep pouch pocket will be good to keep hands warm.

Underside of pouch pocket

Underside of pouch pocket

Pouch pocket with front edge topstitched.  The back edge will be hidden once the seam above is sewn.

Pouch pocket with front edge topstitched. The back edge will be hidden once the seam above is sewn.

The back bodice and side panels have been seamed and added to the front side panel.  I have used flat fell seams.  When I tested this seam finish on a scrap of the fabric, I found that while it is very soft, is quite springy so I allowed wider seam allowances wherever the flat fell seam will be used.  This has given me a wider amount of fabric to wrap over the trimmed seam.

I made a pattern for the front interfacing which will support the weight of the collar and keep the front edges stable.  This has been cut from sew-in hair canvas (purchased from http://sewexciting.blogspot.com.au/ ).  It is 60 inches/ 150cm wide and very good quality wool and goat hair at a very reasonable cost.

I have pencil marked a line at 1 ½” /3cm inside all cut edges that will be sewn into seams.  The dart fabric has been removed in preparation for attaching the hair canvas to the mounting cloth..

Pencil line marked 3cm/ 1 1/2

Pencil line marked 3cm/
1 1/2″ from cut edges of sections which will be included in seam allowances.

Dart sections of hair canvas removed to eliminate bulk.

Dart sections of hair canvas removed to eliminate bulk.

So that I can check whether I like the width of the collar, I have assembled the lining and attached it to the upper collar/facing and have placed it on my dress model to “live with it” for a few days before I make a decision.

Inset corner where bodice is joined to the front/skirt section.  Pleat is caused by allowance for the pocket.

Inset corner where bodice is joined to the front/skirt section. Pleat is caused by allowance for the pocket.

Stitching the second side of the inset corner.

Stitching the second side of the inset corner.

Unfortunately, time has run away from me this week and I am yet to cut the mounting cloth for the hair canvas so it can be applied to the wrong side of the under collar ready for the pad stitching.

Until next week.

Donna Karan Jacket – Vogue 1263 – Part 1

A recent unplanned purchase of a textured wool blend fabric at Spotlight sparked a search through my patterns for just the right style.

Last year I purchased this Vogue pattern with the intention of making it in wool for a casual winter jacket.

Line drawing Vogue 1263

Line drawing Vogue 1263

As I mentioned, I had not planned to buy the fabric during my visit to Spotlight for some haberdashery but, as soon as I saw it, I loved the colour and soft feel of the fabric and could not pass it by.  Consequently, I did not buy enough for this jacket which takes 3.3 metres (80 cm more than I bought).  Luckily, I was able to purchase some more and I bought the length of the facing – because of the wide shawl collar I needed another 1.2 metres.

I really should practise what I preach and have some measurements with me at all times in case I come across an irresistible piece of fabric!  But, all’s well that ends well.

Fabric Considerations:

The pattern lists suitable fabrics as “Novelty Organza, Wool Crepe, Cloqué or Taffeta”.

Since I was unsure what cloqué actually was, I looked it up using Google and found the following description:

“Translated from French (literally meaning ‘blistered’) Cloqué is sometimes referred to as Clox or Cloky.  Cloqué fabric is compound or double fabric with a Jacquard effect. Produced by using yarns of different characters or twists and very often blended with silk/wool or silk cotton.”

A close look at the photographs of the garment would seem to show that this was the fabric used.

Donna Karan jacket - made in cloque

Donna Karan jacket – made in cloque

The original jacket is unlined, except for the pocket and, apart from supporting the pocket opening, there is no interfacing in the jacket.  I can only assume that cloqué has a lot of body to it.

My fabric is a wool blend with a textured surface.  It is quite soft and has a heavy drape which I think will work well, especially for the back of the jacket and the large shawl collar.

However, it is much too soft to hold the shape of such a large collar without the support of interfacing and I have decided to use a lightweight sew-in hair canvass which will be pad-stitched in place.  Since I will be adding interfacing and wearing it over long sleeved garments, I will also line it so that it will be much easier to put on and remove.

The collar may also be a little too wide for me but since I am adding interfacing I have decided to go ahead with the original width to see how it sits.  It can be cut smaller later on in the construction if needs be.

Pattern Work:

Apart from the fitting alterations I usually need, I needed to make pattern pieces for the front interfacing and the lining.

For the interfacing pattern, I drew the outer edge of the areas to be interfaced which will allow the front shoulder and under collar areas to be supported.  I will be using a lightweight fusible woven interfacing on the upper collar and front facing.

The upper collar/facing extends to the front armhole so I have made a lining pattern which will join the outer edge of the facing and extend to the centre back.  Lining will also be cut from the upper back (allowing a wearing ease pleat in the centre) and upper and under sleeve pieces.

Markings:

Since the fabric is textured, it is difficult to mark with a pencil.  Another consideration is the size of the pieces – the main pattern piece covers the upper front, shawl collar and skirt section across to the centre back.

There are six darts to the hem and several small darts in the upper collar.  The markings for the pocket are within the body of the garment.

To avoid problems with such a large piece of fabric, it was imperative to work with the whole piece flat on the table during the marking process.  I chose to thread mark all notches and match points and used tailor’s tacks to mark the darts.

Tailor's tacks mark dots and darts.

Tailor’s tacks mark dots and darts.

To make accuracy easier to achieve with the pocket placement marks, I traced them on to a separate piece of greaseproof paper which could be aligned on each layer of fabric separately.  This avoided the problem of the large piece of pattern becoming unwieldy and tearing or moving during the marking process.

Pocket markings traced on to greaseproof for ease of marking.  Must remember to reverse the markings!

Pocket markings traced on to greaseproof for ease of marking. Must remember to reverse the markings!

I used dressmaker’s carton and a tracing wheel to transfer the guidelines to the wrong side of the fabric before thread tracing so they would be visible from the right side of the fabric to make installation of the pocket easier.

Testing the Flat Fell Seams:

The pattern suggests flat fell seams to give a clean finish on the inside.  Since I am lining the jacket, this will not be necessary.  However,

I tested the technique and like the appearance of a padded seam.  A normal thread topstitch would disappear in the texture of this fabric so I used two threads through the needle to complete the final topstitching – I am quite pleased with the result and will still use these seams in my garment.

Sample flat fell seam with double thread topstitching gives the appearance of a padded seam.

Sample flat fell seam with double thread topstitching gives the appearance of a padded seam.

To make it easier to fold the fabric in these seams, I have allowed 18mm / ¾” seam allowances where I will be using the flat fell seams.

Stabilising the Neckline and Armhole Seams:

Since the fabric does not have a tight weave, I have used cotton tape to stabilise the neckline and armholes.IMG_3245

I have used vertical basting on all the seams.

Seams vertically basted and ready for stitching.

Seams vertically basted and ready for stitching.

Next week I will continue with the pad-stitching and construction.