Another Winter Jacket

A couple of years ago I purchased some lovely  soft  woollen  fabric with a mottled grey, black and white weave to make  a winter jacket.   Having  ”aged” the fabric for a couple of years while I waited for its project idea to arrive(!), I finally decided the time had come.

I wanted to incorporate the collar and asymmetrical front from KwikSew 3531 and the back and sleeve details from a Marfy jacket which is offered as a free pattern with their 2009 issue.  This pattern is not sold separately and I am not sure whether the 2009 issue is still available.  However, the details I used are fairly easy to replicate using a plain bodice jacket back and one piece sleeve.

Kwik Sew pattern 3531 used as a base - front and collar unchanged

Kwik Sew pattern 3531 used as a base – front and collar unchanged

Marfy Catalogue 2009

Marfy Catalogue 2009

Marfy jacket in linen

Marfy jacket in linen

Back and sleeve detail

Back and sleeve detail

I traced all pattern pieces from the KwikSew pattern and made the styling alterations.

The Back

To achieve the swing back, I used the back pattern piece from the KwikSew pattern which was to be cut with centre back on the fold and positioned  the centre back 3 inches /7.5 cm from the fold which resulted in an inverted pleat.   A line was also drawn parallel to the grain line from the centre of the shoulder to the hem.  This insertion was cut and spread by 1 ½” / 3cm at the hem and an extension added to the back side seam ( ¾” / 1.5cm which is half the insertion measurement).  Using this ratio, more could certainly be added to achieve a fuller swing.

Pattern changes to include  inverted pleat and swing back

Pattern changes to include inverted pleat and swing back

To keep the pleat in position, I stitched from the neckline down 6 inches /15cm.   Pleats were sewn from the centre to the outer fold and the excess fabric above the opening trimmed from the undersides of the pleats to avoid extra thickness at the neckline seam.

Return side of pleat removed to minimise bulk

Return side of pleat removed to minimise bulk

The remaining underside of the inverted pleat has been catch stitched to the interfacing and joined into the neckline.  It acts as a stay to keep the pleat in place.

Top edge of underside of inverted pleat connected at neckline seam provides a stay for the pleat

Top edge of underside of inverted pleat connected at neckline seam provides a stay for the pleat

The Sleeves

Again using the KwikSew pattern which has a one piece sleeve, I drew a seam line down the centre of the sleeve and drew in the sleeve flap which lies towards the back section.

Centre seam line added to sleeve; width of facing and sleeve hem detail drawn on to KwikSew sleeve

Centre seam line added to sleeve; width of facing and sleeve hem detail drawn on to KwikSew sleeve

I joined the seam to the top of the button extension and applied a hem facing to finish the bottom of the sleeve.

The top section of the sleeve was cut down the centre and clearly marked front and  back.

Pattern pieces for sleeve and hem facing

Pattern pieces for sleeve and hem facing

Seam allowance was added to all new seam lines.

Inner support

The wool fabric has a very soft hand and is inclined to fray easily.  I fully fused each garment piece with a medium weight knit interfacing to support the structure of the jacket long term.

Underarm Gusset

Once the jacket  sleeves were set into the armholes, I tried the jacket on and found that, despite my taking careful measurements, the sleeves felt a little too close fitting with a heavier top underneath.

To fix the problem, I have inserted an underarm gusset.  This is a good solution for any sleeve that binds a little around the bicep area.

A gusset can be one or two piece.  I chose to open the underarm sleeve seam and the underarm bodice sleeves and insert a diamond gusset  7” x 3” / 18cm x 7.5cm.  The stitching points were marked on the sleeve and jacket seams.  The longest section of the gusset was cut on grain and the piece interfaced for stability.

Diagram of an underarm sleeve gusset

Diagram of an underarm sleeve gusset

Gusset pattern

Gusset pattern

Underarm gusset in sleeve and lining

Underarm gusset in sleeve and lining

When stitching I gusset I find it much easier to achieve an accurate result if I stitch each side individually.  Starting at one sleeve/ side seam junction, each separate section of the gusset was stitched in place in both the garment and the lining.  This has given much easier movement when the jacket is worn over heavier clothing.

Hem Finish

Because of the swing back, the jacket lining has been hemmed and left hanging separately.  Hong Kong finish has been applied to the jacket hem which was then hand stitched in place.

Frenchtacks have been added at the side seam allowances and between the underarm seam allowances to keep the lining in place.

Hem finished with Hong Kong binding; French tack secures lining and top of hem

Hem finished with Hong Kong binding; French tack secures lining and top of hem

Trim

Russia braid has been applied by hand to the outer edges of the jacket, around the bottom of the sleeves and on the flaps of the pockets.

Russia braid applied by hand around outer edges of jacket, sleeve and pocket tab.

Russia braid applied by hand around outer edges of jacket, sleeve and pocket tab.

Buttons covered with faux leather have been stitched in place on the sleeves and at the collar.  The opening for the button is an inseam buttonhole and a large press stud/snap has been stitched to the underlap side to hold the front in place.

Inseam buttonhole, faux leather button and large snap on underside

Inseam buttonhole, faux leather button and large snap on underside

The weather in Brisbane is indulging my love of wearing coats with a westerly wind due on Monday and Tuesday so I will have an opportunity to wear this new one as well.

Front detail

Front detail

Side and back detail

Side and back detail

Beau has been helping me with the blog - he has his own cushion (formerly a pin cushion)

Beau has been helping me with the blog – he has his own cushion (formerly a pin cushion)

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10 thoughts on “Another Winter Jacket

  1. Love your jacket Alison and also all the construction details you always provide for your garments. Elizabeth Dickson

  2. Thanks once again Alison. I loved this jacket when i saw it in “the flesh” last week. I am thoroughly enjoying your blogs and thank you for all the effort you put in to giving us such detailed & informative blogs. xxxx
    Su

  3. Gorgeous jacket and thank you for explaining how you combined both patterns. The Russian Braid looks very interesting and another item I need to search for.

    • Thanks, Sharon. Russia braid is a wonderfully versatile trim. It shapes easily and can be a subtle or dramatic accent. Sckafs have it, sometimes in other colours. Best wishes, Alison

  4. Love the statement “aged the fabric”. Do you remember me buying that green wool the first time you came down? You told me to do exactly this and I piped around the neckline and sleeves , I always getting asked where I bought it. Cheers Chris

    • I remember that beautiful green wool very well. I still have my fuschia piece – probably it will come to life next year. Would love to see a photo of your finished garment. Cheers, Alison

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